Influenza 2 : Medical Assistants Class


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    OR REVIEW THE FOLLOWING CLASS KNOWLEDGE BLOCKS


  • A vaccine made with live, weakened flu virus is the:

    nasal-spray flu vaccine

    Rationale: The nasal-spray vaccine, also known as LAIV (Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine), is a type of influenza vaccine that is made with live, weakened flu virus. These live viruses do not cause the influenza virus, as they are weakened. LAIV is recommended for patients between the ages of 2 and 49, and without any types of chronic illnesses. This is a popular choice for many people because the pain of an injection is not required.

  • Each person should receive a flu vaccine:

    once per flu season

    Rationale: A flu vaccine should be given one time per season to help prevent infection of the influenza virus. There are numerous strands of influenza present in the world. Each year, research is done to determine what the most prevalent strands are in the community, in order to vaccinate people against the strands of influenza virus that they are most likely to be affected by. In 2012-2013, there are 3 common strands of influenza virus that are in the seasonal flu vaccine. These 3 types are Influenza B, H1N1, and H3N2. Next year, the vaccine may be different if it is determined that other strands are more prominent.

  • If you receive the influenza vaccine, your risk of getting the flu are:

    lowered to 10%

    Rationale: Your risk of developing the flu are decreased by 90% when compared to people that have not been vaccinated. However, the flu vaccines is not a substitute for the basic prevention methods. It is always important to wash your hands, and follow all measures to prevent the spread of disease.

  • People should not get a flu vaccine if they have an allergy to:

    chicken eggs

    Rationale: All influenza vaccines are prepared my injecting the virus into chicken eggs. The risk of a severe reaction to the vaccine is rare, but the recommendation continues to be that people with a prior severe reaction or allergy to chicken eggs should not receive the influenza vaccine.

  • People who are higher risk of severe complications from the flu, if they should become infected with the virus, are:

    pregnant women

    Rationale: Changes in the body during pregnancy causse pregnant women to be at a higher risk of severe complications from the influenza virus. It is important for pregnant women to get the flu vaccine for their own health, as well as their unborn baby.

  • The body produces antibodies to the influenza virus by:

    influenza vaccine

    Rationale: The influenza vaccine causes the body to develop antibodies to the influenza virus about 2 weeks after being given. The vaccine is recommended for almost everyone, but especially the very young, the very old, and those with chronic illnesses or weakened immune systems.

  • The flu shot is an:

    inactivated virus

    Rationale: The flu shot, given as an injection in the arm, is an inactivated virus. This means that the virus is "killed", or no longer alive when it is injected into your body. This allows the person being vaccinated to not become infected with the influenza virus, but it does initiate the development of antibodies, which are necessary to fight off the viral infection. Since the injection is a "dead" virus, a person should not develop flu symptoms after receiving the vaccination.

  • The most common side effect from the flu shot is:

    soreness or redness at injection site

    Rationale: The most common complaint after receiving the influenza injection is pain at the site where the shot was given. The injection is not a live virus, and there is not a risk of developing the influenza virus from the vaccine. Other common complaints after the vaccine are body aches and low-grade fever, which are a side effect of the antibodies that are being produced in your body as a response to the vaccine. These symptoms usually go away within 24 hours.

  • The most common side effect of the nasal-spray influenza vaccine is :

    runny nose

    Rationale: Runny nose is the most common side effect of the nasal spray vaccine for children and adults. If nasal congestion is present before receiving the immunization, it is recommended that you wait until the symptoms pass so that all of the vaccine is properly absorbed in the nasal passageways.

  • The seasonal flu vaccine provides protection against:

    the most common strands of influenza present in the season

    Rationale: There are numerous strands of influenza present in the world. Each year, research is done to determine what the most prevalent strands are in the community, in order to vaccinate people against the strands of influenza virus that they are most likely to be affected by. In 2012-2013, there are 3 common strands of influenza virus that are in the seasonal flu vaccine. These 3 types are Influenza B, H1N1, and H3N2. Next year, the vaccine may be different if it is determined that other strands are more prominent.

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